• Janine, 2012.01.03, San Salvador, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Janine, 2012.01.03, San Salvador
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
  • Janine, 2012.01.03, San Salvador, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Janine, 2012.01.03, San Salvador
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
  • Janine, Homage (José Nicolás), 2013.01.16, El Congo, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Janine, Homage (José Nicolás), 2013.01.16, El Congo
    640,960
    Not For Sale
  • Homage (Rothko and Ianelli), 2014.01.22, El Congo, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Homage (Rothko and Ianelli), 2014.01.22, El Congo
    640,960
    Not For Sale
  • Muriel Hasbun Homage, (El altar de la memoria), 2014.03.25, El Congo, archival pigment print, 2016.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Muriel Hasbun Homage, (El altar de la memoria), El Congo
    1114,743
    Not For Sale
  • Trace, 2015.02.25, Washington, DC, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Trace, 2015.02.25, Washington, DC
    1203,800
    Not For Sale
  • Janine (Agfa-Portriga), from the archive, Washington, DC, archival pigment print, 2016.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Janine (Agfa-Portriga), from the archive, Washington, DC,
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
  • Family Frames, 2016.07.06, from the archive c. 1960's, El Congo, archival pigment print, 2016.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Family Frames, 2016.07.06, from the archive c. 1960's, El Congo
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
  • Super 8mm film, 2014.09.20, from the archive, circa 1960's, Washington, DC, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Super 8mm film, from the archive, Washington, DC
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
  • Ojos (Mami y yo), from the archive, Washington, DC, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Ojos (Mami y yo), from the archive, Washington, DC
    1200,787
    Not For Sale
  • Je me souviens, c. 1945 (1986), from the archive, revisited 2016, Washington, DC, archival pigment print, 2016.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Je me souviens, c. 1945 (1986), from the archive, revisited 2016, Wash
    640,960
    Not For Sale
  • Juif, from the archive (1997), Washington, DC, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Juif, from the archive (1997), Washington, DC
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
  • In Memoriam, 2014.06.12, El Congo, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    In Memoriam, 2014.06.12, El Congo
    640,960
    Not For Sale
  • In the Center of the Labyrinth/En el centro del laberinto, 2016.07.06, El Congo, archival pigment print, 2016.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    In the Center of the Labyrinth/En el centro del laberinto, 2016.07.06,
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
  • Blue (Martorell), 2012.11.08, El Congo, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Blue (Martorell), 2012.11.08, El Congo
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
  • Daniel, from the archive, c. 2004, El Congo, archival pigment print, 2016.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Daniel, from the archive, c. 2004, El Congo
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
  • Giza and the Sphinx, 2016.07.26, from the archive (2008 and c. 1970's), Washington, DC, archival pigment print, 2016.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Giza and the Sphinx, from the archive (2008 and c. 1970's)
    640,960
    Not For Sale
  • 2012.11.04, El Congo, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    2012.11.04, El Congo
    640,960
    Not For Sale
  • Gift (Daniel), 2012.07.29, El Congo, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Gift (Daniel), 2012.07.29, El Congo
    640,960
    Not For Sale
  • Janine, 2011.12.11, San Salvador / Washington, DC, archival pigment print, 2015.

    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    Janine 2011.12.11 San Salvador/Washington, DC (si je meurs/if I die)
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
  •  2012.11.22, El Congo, El Salvador, archival pigment print, 2015.



    Throughout my career, I have employed photography to investigate issues of identity, memory and inter-subjectivity. I have created a dialogue between the past and the present and between personal memory and collective history, sparking new questions about identity, cultural memory and place.


    My mother and her story have been formative to my development as person and as an artist. Growing up in El Salvador during a time of strife, within a Salvadoran/Palestinian Christian and Polish/French Jewish family, tuned me in to the complexities of belonging. Through my work, I’ve explored my family’s history and it’s various exiles and diasporas, and have re-constructed a world inhabited by trauma and loss.


    Si je meurs/if I die continues on that path, through a subjective, diasporic space that validates and affirms first-person narratives and memories. 

    An extended portrait, these photographs explore the fragile space between absence and presence, and continue the conversation I’ve had with my mother, Janine Janowski, and my family and communities, through my work, over 30 years.


    The photos evolved naturally as we confronted the most human of destinies:

    --As if I could ever get used to it

    --As if the picture would somehow wish it away…


    In the process, I discover, examine and reconfigure an archive, paying homage to our relationship, constructing my own sense of identity and alluding to the legacy that she left behind.


    A survivor of the Holocaust by hiding together with her immediate family in the Auvergne region of France, Janine went to El Salvador in 1958 to work as the teacher of the French Consul's children. A few years later, she married Antonio Hasbun Z., a Palestinian/Salvadoran dentist and a photographer, making El Salvador her new home.


    With these photographs, I share my intimate perspective to the historically-significant, public narrative of Janine’s life as a cultural promoter and founder of the renowned galería el laberinto in El Salvador during the civil war and its aftermath, now reactivated through laberinto projects (http://www.laberintoprojects.com), my socially engaged, arts, education and cultural legacy platform, also inspired by her.

    2012.11.22, El Congo, El Salvador
    1200,800
    Not For Sale
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